Recommended Health Checks

It’s a good idea to see your doctor for a regular health check even if you are currently feeling fit and healthy.

Regular health checks and screening tests can help you to stay healthy by:

  • finding health problems at an early stage before they develop into more serious chronic conditions
  • helping to prevent and detect serious illness like cancer.

If you have a family history of a certain disease or other risk factors, regular health checks and screening tests are even more important.

Women’s Health Checks

Screening tests also recommended for women include:

Cervical Screening Tests replaced PAP tests in 2018. This new test is more reliable than the PAP test and only needs to be done every five years. Self-collection is a new option for women who are over 30 years old and who are not participating in regular cervical screening. Talk to your GP about cervical screening options.

BreastScreen SA provides free screening mammograms (breast X-rays) every two years to South Australian women primarily aged 50 to 74, with the aim of diagnosing breast cancer at an early stage, before it can be felt. Early detection can maximise the options for simpler treatments and more successful outcomes.

The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program involves testing for bowel cancer in people aged 50-74 years who do not have any obvious symptoms of the disease. This is a free test posted to your home every two years. If you are eligible for bowel screening but have lost your kit or it has been damaged in the post you can get a replacement by calling the National Cancer Screening Register on 1800 627 701.

Other recommended regular health tests include:

Talk to your GP about having a regular health check.

To find a GP in your local area visit the National Health Services Directory or the hospitals and health services page.

Men’s Health Checks

Screening tests also recommended for men include:

The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program involves testing for bowel cancer in people aged 50-74 years who do not have any obvious symptoms of the disease. This is a free test posted to your home every two years. If you are eligible for bowel screening but have lost your kit or it has been damaged in the post you can get a replacement by calling the National Cancer Screening Register on 1800 627 701.

Prostate cancer develops when abnormal cells in the prostate gland in an uncontrolled way, forming a malignant tumour. Prostate cancer may be suspected if a blood test to check your prostate specific antigen (PSA) level is above normal levels for your age.

Other recommended regular health tests include:

Talk to your GP about having a regular health check.

To find a GP in your local area visit the National Health Services Directory or the hospitals and health services page.

Aboriginal Health Checks

In addition to the health checks listed above, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are encouraged to have an annual health check to help identify potential illnesses before they occur.  The “715 Health Check” is free at Aboriginal Medical Services and bulk billing clinics. 

Run in partnership with Aboriginal Health Services, One Stop Screening Shops offer multiple cancer screening tests and information sessions on the same day, in an effort to reduce the incidence of cancer in the Aboriginal community. For more information email: Health.PrevandPopHealth@sa.gov.au